Why do we want the LBL to be returned to pre-European?

Why do we want the LBL to be returned to pre-European?

Question: “Why do we want the LBL to be returned to pre-European?” This question is a recurring concern throughout our listening sessions and even before that. Since I arrived at Land Between The Lakes in 2013, I have reviewed the Area Plan numerous times to guide my decision making process. Many of our documents, signs, and brochures reference a “pre-European” point in time. Because of hearing people’s concerns, I decided to research why those involved in writing our Area Plan selected that point in time to reference. I found the answer in our Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Land and…
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A Raptor’s Tail

A Raptor’s Tail

  “They like my feather patterns the best! That’s why they’re here,” argued Barred Owl. “Ha, everyone knows they’re here to marvel over my eye sight,” cawed Red-tailed Hawk. “They’re the best eyes at the Nature Station, and I dare say, some of the greatest in the entire world.” “No, they’ve come to ‘ooh’ over my majestic hoo-ing and ‘awe’ about my grand wisdom,” said Great Horned Owl. Screech Owl chortled to himself as the crowd of people gathered not far from their perches, anxiously waiting for the Parade of Raptors to begin. “Oh, and I suppose you have a…
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Public Listening Session 1

Public Listening Session 1

Editor’s Note: The following notes come from a listening session/meeting we held with members of the public. The notes were supplied by a third party professional; we submit these notes without changes except to fix name spellings. If you have any questions, please email us at [email protected] Thank you. Jan Bush Land Between The Lakes Public Listening Session May 21, 2015 Kenlake State Resort Park 4:00-6:00pm Attendees: Facilitator Assistant Facilitator US Forest Service: 4 staff officers Individuals identified by city or state: Alvaton, KY: 1 Berea, KY: 2 Bumpus Mills, TN: 1 Cadiz, KY: 11 Chattanooga, TN: 2 Dover, KY: 1…
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Oh Deer!

Oh Deer!

  Spring means babies all over Land Between The Lakes.  At the Nature Station we're excited that one of our white-tailed deer had TWINS! Come on out and check them out. The size of these two tiny deer, with their coats of ruddy brown and ivory spots, compare to the size of dinner plates. Cautiously, their mother hides them at the bases of trees or along fallen logs, blending in with leaves and duff on the forest floor. This serves as a very important life strategy for deer. Their spotted camouflage and lack of any body scent make them invisible…
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Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge

Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge

Submitted by Brian Truskey Communications Department apprentice at Land Between The Lakes The next time you come to visit Land Between The Lakes, plan to visit to our neighbors to the south at the Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge encompasses 51,000 acres of forest, farmland and grassland wildlife habitat. In 1945 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service established the area to provide feeding, resting, and nesting habitat for migratory birds. Now over 306 species of birds currently call the refuge home at some point during the year. Over 50 types of mammals, 144 fish species, around 90 species of frogs,…
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Field Guide to Fall Hiking

Field Guide to Fall Hiking

By John Pollpeter, Lead Naturalist, Woodlands Nature Station Honker Lake Trail Autumn brings some of the best hiking opportunities at Land Between the Lakes. The changing colors and mild temperatures chase away the feelings of heat and humidity of late summer. Honker Lake Trail checks off all the major components for a great fall day hike – and more! My favorite, Honker Trail is located near our Woodlands Nature Station. You can easily come visit our back yard with our natural gardens, bat boxes, and rescued native animals before or after your hike. The trail loops around Honker Lake for…
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Rare bird spotted at Long Creek Refuge

Rare bird spotted at Long Creek Refuge

Rare sighting of a Roseated Spoonbill  By John Pollpeter, Lead Naturalist at Woodlands Nature Station Birders got an extra treat this August as a Roseated Spoonbill, an unusual wading bird from Florida and the Gulf Coast, decided to visit Land Between the Lakes. The bird stayed around for about two weeks. The spoonbill foraged at the Long Creek Refuge at the corner of Highway US68/KY80 and Energy Lake Road near Barkley Bridge. This man-made wetland refuge is one of the most popular birding spots in Land Between The Lakes. Roseated spoonbills have visited Land Between the Lakes before along Honker…
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Eagle Nesting Season in Land Between The Lakes

Eagle Nesting Season in Land Between The Lakes

Submitted by Ray Stainfield, Volunteer at Land Between The Lakes In 2014, there were 14 active nests in Kentucky which produced 20 fledglings and 5 active nests in Tennessee which produced 6 fledglings.  The total for Land Between the Lakes is 26 fledglings from 19 active nests. There were 8 nests in Kentucky and 4 in Tennessee that were inactive but in good condition. In all, there was an increase of 12 new nests on the Land Between the Lakes, 7 in Kentucky and 5 in Tennessee.  The fledgling season was 3 months long with the first fledgling leaving the nest…
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See wildlife like ‘Asia’ did

See wildlife like ‘Asia’ did

This testimonial was submitted by a guest on one of our Sunset Kayak Tours. Sign up for our Canoe and Kayak Tours in August (16, 30, and 31)!    Hi Denise, I just wanted to let you know that the kayaking was AMAZING. We saw tons of wildlife: beavers, deer (that swam!), blue herons, egrets, etc. Our guides were incredibly nice and knowledgeable, and the kayaking was really fun. Plus, we ended up knowing almost everyone in our group (fellow Murrayans and WKMS listeners!). AND we got to howl with the wolves/coyotes. What else do you need? Haha. In fact, we're…
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Armadillos Have Arrived

Armadillos Have Arrived

By John Pollpeter, Lead Naturalist at  Woodlands Nature Station People associate Land Between The Lakes with eagles, pelicans, white-tail deer, turkeys, and now – armadillos.  Our region boasts the largest population of the nine-banded armadillo in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. So let’s learn about our newest resident: How did they get here? Armadillos have been naturally migrating north from two southern populations --Texas and Florida.  Armadillos are native to Texas.  In the late 19th century a resident of Florida introduced a small population into Florida. These two populations later merged and have been marching north ever since. Rivers and streams…
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