Thousand Cankers Disease Monitoring Project 2022

Walnut Twig Beetle | Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, bugwood.org Background: Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD) is an insect/disease complex caused by the combination of the lethal fungus, Geosmithia morbida, and the walnut twig beetle, Pityophthorus juglandis. This disease is native to the southwestern United States, but in the last decade, TCD has been discovered in many eastern states as well. It has been discovered in several of Kentucky’s neighboring states, however it hasn’t been detected in the Commonwealth to date. Black Walnut is highly susceptible to this disease which causes major dieback and mortality in these trees. Walnut Twig Beetle…
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The Land Between the Lakes 2022 Heritage Geocache Challenge: The Heritage of Wildlife Conservation

The Heritage Geocache Challenge begins Friday, June 10, 2022 at Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area. The Wildlife Conservation Heritage Challenge Coin The annual Heritage Geocache Challenge is put on by the Heritage Program at Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area as part of our outreach to the public, to get people to explore their forest and their history, and to share the unique heritage of the families from Between the Rivers. About the GeocachesThis is the sixth year of the Heritage Geocache Challenge at the Land Between the Lakes and, like in previous years, we like people…
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Soldiers From Fort Campbell Assist in Clean-up at Cleo Griffin House

Soldiers From Fort Campbell Assist in Clean-up at Cleo Griffin House

Soldiers from Alpha Company, 39th Brigade Engineer Battalion came out to the Land Between the Lakes for a very special mission. They helped the Heritage program begin a project to safeguard and preserve the house formerly occupied by Cleo Sanford Griffin. Griffin was a veteran of World War II and, according to locals, may have suffered from PTSD. He was in the Battle of Monte Cassino which began in January 1944 and didn’t end until May of that year. Allied casualties were in excess of 55,000. So it would be understandable if Griffin did, indeed, suffer PTSD as a result.…
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Strutting through the Elk and Bison Prairie

Strutting through the Elk and Bison Prairie

Some folks seem to forget that the Elk and Bison Prairie is also home to lots of other wildlife. For example, this was a good morning to see wild turkeys, which happen to be in the mood for their spring breeding season.  This is the time where the male turkeys (gobblers) like to show off their prowess to the neighborhood females (hens) by fanning out their tail feathers and puffing out their body feathers and ‘strut’ to show off how handsome they are to the hens and how big and mean they look to other competing gobblers… kind of like…
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Dusk till Dawn

Dusk till Dawn

I looked east and spotted the orange glow piercing through the oaks still leafless from the long winter nights. I turned right from the trailhead and regained my footing as I reached a muddy path. I slipped and contorted in many ways as I tried to maintain my footing. My mind kept racing, “warm thoughts, warm thoughts,” but it did nothing to stop my now uncontrollable shivering. Only a madman could be up in these conditions for my specific agenda. I stumbled in the half-morn light crashing heavily on a twig. The crack pierced the cold morning air and a…
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Reel Back in Time

Reel Back in Time

Sometimes forgotten is the history of the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers and how they influenced not only the economic welfare of the area but the development of recreation activities including sport fishing. This Homeplace 1850s apprentice is an avid sportsman and has added his passion and knowledge of sport fishing to the Homeplace 1850s historical research and program files. Before the impoundment of the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers, fishing was just as popular and leisurely of a pastime as it is today. Anglers all across the country, especially in the Between the Rivers area, indulged in the challenge of fooling…
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They Grow Up So Fast!

They Grow Up So Fast!

May 2, 2014 was a big day for the Woodlands Nature Station. Peeking into the wolf den, the dim morning light barely revealed the two squiggly forms covered in reddish brown fur. With flattened ears, closed eyes, and barely a whimper, the light highlighted their vulnerable faces.  I picked up the larger of the two pups. She weighed ¾ of a pound, her only distinguishing mark being a long white stripe from her tiny chest to her belly.  It was a healthy little red wolf pup! It was the first one born at the Woodlands Nature Station in 20 years. …
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Local Students’ Project Helps Osprey Conservation

Local Students’ Project Helps Osprey Conservation

Submitted by John Pollpeter, Lead Naturalist at Woodlands Nature Station During the 2016-2017 school year, Trigg County Middle School participated in a teaching method called “Project-based Learning.”  Students are given a project or problem, and then incorporate writing, math, science, art, and computer skills attempt to develop a solution. Ms. Brannigan Ethridge’s 8th grade class was given a list of species that need conservation help. Two students, Zach Meador and Hannah Fletcher, were able to take the project even further than they could imagine. The two students, working with the US Forest Service, developed a plan to put up an…
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Help Protect Resources

Help Protect Resources

The Paradise Timber Sale near Forest Service Road 113 is coming to a close. Loggers have removed their equipment and have begun to restore roads accessing open lands to their pre-sale condition. As part of their contractual obligations, the logging company will install water diversion structures, plant wildlife-friendly native seed mixes, and mulch where needed along access roads impacted by the sale. If you drive along Forest Service Road 113, you will find barricades in place. We are asking you to refrain from driving or walking through these sensitive areas so native grasses can begin to grow. Thank you for your cooperation. John Westbrook Environmental…
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New Bobcat at Woodlands Nature Station

New Bobcat at Woodlands Nature Station

The Woodlands Nature Station is happy to announce a new, frisky resident in our bobcat enclosure. The Nature Station is a permanent, educational home to several species of native wildlife who cannot be released into the wild due to injury or imprinting-- being too comfortable around humans. A Bobcat Story The 10-month old bobcat made Nature Station his home on March 20, 2017. He was hit by a car as a young, 8-week old kitten and suffered back leg trauma. Caring individuals took him to Walden's Puddle Wildlife Rehabilitation and Education Center in Joelton, TN. Walden's Puddle staff successfully repaired his leg…
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