Land Between The Lakes Deer Population Study

Land Between The Lakes Deer Population Study

Information received from hunters and other interest groups potentially indicates a change in the deer population density at Land Between The Lakes National Recreation Area.  We are conducting an analysis of historic population trends and other data. A vital and sustainable deer population is important to our habitat and native species restoration and management efforts.  We will provide more information as it becomes available.
Read More
Buffalo Trail Prescribed Fire

Buffalo Trail Prescribed Fire

After a four-month delay, conditions were just right on Monday, March 28 for us to begin our prescribed burn.  A moderate East to West wind gently blew into the forest and across the open lands.  Humidity, temperature, and atmospheric conditions in the target area were optimal.  The Bison Trail was our burn block for the day. Dozens of Forest Service employees, students, and volunteers from multiple organizations and agencies gathered at Land Between the Lakes’ well-equipped fire cache for a briefing.  Leadership, old and new, laid out the plan.  If everything went well, we would set alight almost 2,530 acres of the burn…
Read More
Antler Shed Season

Antler Shed Season

Submitted by Patricia Skibko, Wildlife Apprentice If you want to see elk with their antlers, come now to the Elk & Bison Prairie. Each year bull elk lose their antlers in the early spring. Antlers typically fall off independently of each other. Usually both shed within about one week. They take a lot of punishment through fights with other bulls during the mating season. When elk lose their antlers, new ones start growing almost immediately. Throughout a bull’s lifetime each new set of antlers grown are larger than the last. Elaborate antlers are an indicator that an elk bull is…
Read More
Happy Groundhog Day

Happy Groundhog Day

"Now, Let's See what is going on in Your Neck of the Woods" By John Pollpeter, Lead Naturalist at Woodlands Nature Station Patches of emerald-green blades from spring grasses outline a dusting of white winter snow, as a fuzzy sniffing nose emerges from the security and warmth of his underground burrow. Two bright brown eyes and a set of inquisitive whiskers search the February breeze for potential marauding predators and attractive mates. He is looking for female groundhogs. Each February 2nd, Americans celebrate the potential for spring with a giant rodent, the groundhog. A member of the squirrel family, the…
Read More
How many acres of grasslands, barrens, savannas, and woodlands?

How many acres of grasslands, barrens, savannas, and woodlands?

Over time, how many acres of LBL will be converted to the Pre-European landscape plan of grasslands, barrens, savannas and woodlands? Our Land and Resource Management Plan reserves 8,630 acres for oak-grasslands demonstration areas.  The 2004 Land and Resource Management Plan for Land Between The Lakes refers to the Pre-European landscape specifically for the Oak Grasslands Restoration Demonstration Areas, the Elk &Bison Praire-700 acres, and the south Bison Range-180 acres. Land Between The Lakes is divided into multiple land uses, including administrative areas, recreation and environmental areas, and natural resource areas.  These acres are designated to be managed for a…
Read More
Cost for managing an oak-grassland habitat

Cost for managing an oak-grassland habitat

What is the anticipated costs and what is currently budgeted for maintenance of the existing '8600' acres of savanna/grass lands? Accounting data for the costs of this project (8,600)? We project out our costs for programs such as timber and fire then submit a request for funding annually. This is done as one budget item. We do not break it down into such detail. As land managers we take into account our areas that need treatments and plan for those areas several years in advance. You can find more information about where we spend our funds in one of our…
Read More
Part Of The Pack–My First Encounter with Red Wolves

Part Of The Pack–My First Encounter with Red Wolves

Part Of The Pack--My First Encounter with Red Wolves By Anita Spaulding, Naturalist Apprentice for Woodlands Nature Station I am an apprentice at Land Between The Lakes who recently graduated from Murray State University with a degree in Recreation and Leisure Services. Working at the Woodlands Nature Station is my first full-time position post-college. I came to this job with a very strong interest in animals and a little experience volunteering at several different animal shelters and organizations. Red Wolves fascinate me and I get to work with them--What could be better? Red Wolves are incredible creatures to behold. Agile…
Read More
Elk are Shedding Velvet

Elk are Shedding Velvet

Submitted by Curtis Fowler, Range Technician at Land Between The Lakes Some of you may notice that several of the elk are losing their velvet, which is the fuzzy growing layer that covers their antlers from spring until…about this time of the year. The elk’s antlers are more brittle during this growth time.  Once the velvet stops growing, the elk start to rub it off using branches and tree trunks.  The antlers will harden completely in time for the breeding season, well-polished and ready to fight. Come on out and see if you can spot one!
Read More
A Raptor’s Tail

A Raptor’s Tail

  “They like my feather patterns the best! That’s why they’re here,” argued Barred Owl. “Ha, everyone knows they’re here to marvel over my eye sight,” cawed Red-tailed Hawk. “They’re the best eyes at the Nature Station, and I dare say, some of the greatest in the entire world.” “No, they’ve come to ‘ooh’ over my majestic hoo-ing and ‘awe’ about my grand wisdom,” said Great Horned Owl. Screech Owl chortled to himself as the crowd of people gathered not far from their perches, anxiously waiting for the Parade of Raptors to begin. “Oh, and I suppose you have a…
Read More
Oh Deer!

Oh Deer!

  Spring means babies all over Land Between The Lakes.  At the Nature Station we're excited that one of our white-tailed deer had TWINS! Come on out and check them out. The size of these two tiny deer, with their coats of ruddy brown and ivory spots, compare to the size of dinner plates. Cautiously, their mother hides them at the bases of trees or along fallen logs, blending in with leaves and duff on the forest floor. This serves as a very important life strategy for deer. Their spotted camouflage and lack of any body scent make them invisible…
Read More