Armadillos Have Arrived

Armadillos Have Arrived

By John Pollpeter, Lead Naturalist at  Woodlands Nature Station People associate Land Between The Lakes with eagles, pelicans, white-tail deer, turkeys, and now – armadillos.  Our region boasts the largest population of the nine-banded armadillo in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. So let’s learn about our newest resident: How did they get here? Armadillos have been naturally migrating north from two southern populations --Texas and Florida.  Armadillos are native to Texas.  In the late 19th century a resident of Florida introduced a small population into Florida. These two populations later merged and have been marching north ever since. Rivers and streams…
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Bloody Bison

Bloody Bison

By Curtis Fowler, Elk & Bison Prairie Manager If you visited or will be visiting the Elk & Bison Prairie today or the next few days, you may get a glimpse of a bison that damaged its right horn cap sometime between last night and this morning when we checked the herd. This type of injury is fairly minor. It does produce a lot of blood as you can see by the photo. This is a female yearling.  She must have bumped something harder than her horn. This “bump” broke the seal on her horn between her hard outer shell…
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King of the Snakes

King of the Snakes

Submitted by John Pollpeter, Lead Naturalist at Woodlands Nature Station Just like the lion is “king” of the beasts, the black or common kingsnake is “king” of the snakes.  Kingsnakes regularly eat snakes, including venomous ones, as they are partially immune to the venom.  Kingsnakes are not venomous. The black kingsnake will strike the rattlesnake behind the head, grasping it tightly as it coils itself around the other snake. The coils slowly constrict the rattlesnake, killing it rather quickly. After a time, the kingsnake will uncoil and begin eating, head first to unhinge its jaws, and swallowing the dead rattler.…
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Summer in the Elk and Bison Prairie

Summer in the Elk and Bison Prairie

The following is provided by Curtis Fowler, Range Technician at Land Between The Lakes: Sure, the brown fuzzy things are the number one interest to most of the visitors who drive through the Elk and Bison Prairie; however, there are a lot more feathered, crawling, and flowering things in there if you are willing to take the time to slow down and enjoy them too! Remember, when it is hot, the ones wearing the coats like to find shade, so look for the other things that like to show off for visitors regardless of the weather. Enjoy your visit! --Curtis
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New Elk Calves at Elk & Bison Prairie

New Elk Calves at Elk & Bison Prairie

The following is provided by Curtis Fowler, Range Technician at Land Between The Lakes: Here are some more photos of elk calves taken last week at the Elk and Bison Prairie.  Some of the calves and their mothers have been exploring in small groups, so calves are occasionally seen in the late evenings. We have confirmed at least 7 different calves so far, but expect that others are out there hiding. We suspect a few others are still to come. Enjoy your visit! --Curtis    
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Rare Red Wolf Born in Captivity at Land Between The Lakes

Rare Red Wolf Born in Captivity at Land Between The Lakes

GOLDEN POND, KY—Land Between The Lakes National Recreation Area is pleased to announce the birth of a ¾ pound female red wolf on May 2,2014. The Woodlands Nature Station’s captive, endangered red wolves are the proud parents. The new female pup is just now emerging from her den and stretching her legs followed by two very attentive and nervous parents. She will remain with her parents for at least 18 months and then be transferred to a zoo or nature center to start her own pack. “As she gets older and braver, the little pup will become more visible. Right…
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First Elk Calf of the Season

First Elk Calf of the Season

Story submitted by Curtis Fowler, Range Technician at Land Between The Lakes National Recreation Area-- As spring turns into summer, bison at the Elk & Bison Prairie have been producing calves almost every week since early April. Memorial Day weekend marks the time that elk normally start producing their calves at the Elk & Bison Prairie. The first calf was seen on June 8; however, there are likely a few others hiding in the bushes. Bugle Corps staff have spotted 4 elk calves so far over the past week. This week, we located one of the newest calves and tagged it…
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Scenic Viewing and Special Places Inventory

Scenic Viewing and Special Places Inventory

We ask you to complete this Scenic Viewing and Special Places Inventory and tell us about your favorite scenic areas. What would you like Land Between The Lakes to emphasize in managing our landscape for high quality scenic integrity? If you would like to complete the scenic viewing and special places inventory, please follow this link https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/8KPQ8KJ. If you would like to learn more about the inventory, read further. Hello! My name is Rourke McDermott and I serve as a Landscape Architect at Valles Caldera National Preserve, north of Santa Fe, New Mexico. During the next five months, I am working…
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Wildflowers Bloom at Elk & Bison Prairie

Wildflowers Bloom at Elk & Bison Prairie

Submitted by Curtis Fowler, Range Technician at Land Between The Lakes National Recreation Area This gorgeous stand of Indian Pink was found in an area of the Elk & Bison Prairie that had been burned during a prescribed fire at the end of March. They are blooming along a shady creekside, creating perfect habitat for wildlife. Wildflowers can be found all across Land Between The Lakes throughout the year. Take a drive or a hike to see what you can find! For more information about Indian Pink, visit http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=SPMA3.
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Osprey: native again

Osprey: native again

Osprey - Pandion haliaetus Summertime visitors today often see osprey plunging "feet-first" into the lakes and ponds after their dinner -- fish. Though native to the area, osprey became victims of pesticides like DDT, illegal hunting and habitat loss. By 1950 nesting osprey could not be found anywhere in Kentucky. Beginning in 1984, Land Between The Lakes took part in a Kentucky-wide osprey restoration effort aimed at re-establishing a resident population of nesting birds. Using a raise and release technique called "hacking," our wildlife staff raised young birds isolated from human contact on a tall hacking tower near the Nature…
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