Help Protect Resources

Help Protect Resources

The Paradise Timber Sale near Forest Service Road 113 is coming to a close. Loggers have removed their equipment and have begun to restore roads accessing open lands to their pre-sale condition. As part of their contractual obligations, the logging company will install water diversion structures, plant wildlife-friendly native seed mixes, and mulch where needed along access roads impacted by the sale. If you drive along Forest Service Road 113, you will find barricades in place. We are asking you to refrain from driving or walking through these sensitive areas so native grasses can begin to grow. Thank you for your cooperation. John Westbrook Environmental…
Read More
Fenton Fire 2017

Fenton Fire 2017

A Managed Wildfire Fire at Land Between the Lakes  Update | March 8, 2017 Q: Where is the Fenton Fire? A: The Fenton Fire, caused by a lightning strike, is on Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area south of US68/KY60 near the Fenton Campground and along the Central Hardwoods Scenic Trail. Q: Is the Fenton Fire still active? A: Yes. The rain event did not extinguish the fire completely. There are areas still smoldering. Even with the rain over the last few days, the ground is drying very quickly. This time of year, trees uptake of water increases. Therefore,…
Read More
Open lands-Helping Wildlife Survive

Open lands-Helping Wildlife Survive

Dear friends, As part of our Land and Resource Management Plan, we designated approximately 10,600 acres as open lands. This acreage specifically supports insects, game animals, grassland type birds, and mammals through open lands management. Managing open lands involves keeping desired vegetation in an early stage of growth. We do this by cultivating and planting our wildlife plantings and cropland areas. We maintain grassland type habitat primarily by mowing, disking, prescribed fire and herbicide applications. These open land types provide food and shelter for hundreds of species at Land Between the Lakes. Since the turn of the 21st Century, natural…
Read More
Sustainable Recreation Arrives

Sustainable Recreation Arrives

Dear Friends, Over these past four years we have been adjusting and adapting our programs and services in order to balance our budget as it “down sized.”  We’re in better shape than other Forest Service units because of our prioritizing strategies we worked on together in our 2012 Budget Reduction Open Houses. Today we want to include you in our part of the region-wide effort to achieve sustainable recreation. Sustainable Recreation = Recreation that Lasts Our regional facilities budget has decreased by more than half and our recreation operations budget has gone down by 12 percent since 2012. We are…
Read More
Update on Fox Hollow Scoping Letter

Update on Fox Hollow Scoping Letter

Dear Interested Party, We received some questions about the scoping letter for Fox Hollow Project dated August 22, 2016. Many of you expected more detail to be provided. We will provide more information as it becomes available.  As part of the collaboration case study on Fox Hollow we want to involve you earlier in the process so we can consider your ideas and concerns before the project is firmly defined. Therefore, we do not have all the detail you are used to seeing at the scoping phase of a project. We posted the information we do know about Fox Hollow…
Read More
Gypsy Moths

Gypsy Moths

Updated May 9, 2017 Forest Service staff have begun placing gypsy moth traps across Land Between the Lakes this week. Please leave the traps alone, as they are used to learn about new isolated populations. Thank you. Submitted by Yvonne Helton, Silviculturist The gypsy moth, Latin name Lymantria dispar, is a devastating forest pest in parts of North America. Gypsy moths originated in Europe and Asia.  We consider them an invasive species.  The first known occurrence of the gypsy moth occurred in 1869 around Boston, MA shortly after Etienne Trouvelot imported egg masses from France. Our forestry staff placed Gypsy…
Read More
Tree Planting at the Elk and Bison Prairie

Tree Planting at the Elk and Bison Prairie

Submitted by Yvonne Helton, Silviculturist We recently planted approximately 1500 shortleaf pine and 70 Bur Oak seedlings within the perimeter of the Elk & Bison Prairie. We chose areas where pine mortality occurred and staff burned off debris piles. So why did we plant Shortleaf Pine?  We value fire tolerant traits such as its ability to re-sprout and natural resistance to fire scar rot.  Shortleaf Pine also produces frequent cone crops. These attributes suit the Elk & Bison Prairie perfectly. Shortleaf Pine may also create a more diverse habitat.  We observed declines of Virginia Pine in the Elk & Bison…
Read More
Respect the Roads

Respect the Roads

We have all heard it before; “respect the resource.”  What does that actually mean?  It means we must work together to maintain and improve what we have. At Land Between the Lakes we place a tremendous focus on maintaining natural settings, scenic views, and healthy forests while balancing the needs of our diverse user groups.  Activities like habitat management, environmental education, camping, and hiking might seem unrelated; yet each one has the potential to affect the other. By being responsible, it is possible for everyone to enjoy the land for years to come. Turkey Bay Off-Highway Vehicle Area serves as…
Read More
Nickell Branch Road Improvement Project

Nickell Branch Road Improvement Project

Road 102 just off the Woodland Trace National Scenic Byway leads to the Nickell Branch recreation area.  An estimated 15 thousand people frequented the 1.2-mile gravel route last year.  Heavy rains we received lately left it a bumpy road and in need of improvements. Kevan Paluso, transportation program manager at Land Between the Lakes, took me and Customer Service Manager Jeff Laird with him to see Road 102 first hand.  Kevan pointed out features and described a project proposal during a recent site visit. Where most people simply see a scarred gravel road, Kevan sees damage, roadside swale restoration, and…
Read More
Buffalo Trail Prescribed Fire

Buffalo Trail Prescribed Fire

After a four-month delay, conditions were just right on Monday, March 28 for us to begin our prescribed burn.  A moderate East to West wind gently blew into the forest and across the open lands.  Humidity, temperature, and atmospheric conditions in the target area were optimal.  The Bison Trail was our burn block for the day. Dozens of Forest Service employees, students, and volunteers from multiple organizations and agencies gathered at Land Between the Lakes’ well-equipped fire cache for a briefing.  Leadership, old and new, laid out the plan.  If everything went well, we would set alight almost 2,530 acres of the burn…
Read More